Partnership for Young London has been awarded funding by Trust for London for a two year programme that looks at youth unemployment.

The aim of this programme is to improve employment policy and practice for young people in London. The focus is on combining youth voice with policy change; helping young people to campaign on employment issues and supporting that with research and roundtables.

If you have experience in the field of youth unemployment, we would love to speak to you about what you are finding in your work.

  • Where are the gaps in knowldege?
  • Which areas of youth unemployment are being neglected?
  • What innovative solutions and good practice examples are you seeing working in tackling youth unemployment?

It would be great to talk by email, or phone, or we can come to visit you.
For more detail of the programme, please visit the webpage or email matthew.walsham@cityoflondon.gov.uk

Latest briefing:

Youth Unemployment Review 2017

This briefing is the first stage of our look into London’s youth unemployment challenge; detailing the recent work done to explore the subject, dating back to May 2014. Broken down into subjects, it presents a handy guide to the literature, from understanding and tackling the skills gap, to market and wage analyses for young people. These reports have been written by a range of organisations, from voluntary sector, government, and businesses. The aim is to place research into a curated, searchable, online database.

Why?

Young people face higher rates of unemployment, and are increasingly faced with less opportunity and a higher cost of living. The recent decision to leave the European Union may also have a greater impact on young people, with European Social Fund programmes in danger of being cut.

  • 5% of young Londoners are unemployed, that represents nearly 1 in 5.
  • Around 1 in 10 young people aged 16-24 are NEET.
  • Young people represent 35% of those on zero contract hours and are not eligible for the new living wage.
  • London offers the fewest numbers of apprenticeships nationally.
  • The unemployment rate for black graduates is double that for white graduates.

For further youth employment statistics, see our recent report ‘Young People Count 2016’

Youth Unemployment Review 2017

This briefing is the first stage of our look into London’s youth unemployment challenge; detailing the recent work done to explore the subject, dating back to May 2014. Broken down into subjects, it presents a handy guide to the literature, from understanding and tackling the skills gap, to market and wage analyses for young people. These reports have been written by a range of organisations, from voluntary sector, government, and businesses. The aim is to place research into a curated, searchable, online database.

Research and briefings

Over the course of the year the programme will produce several pieces of research and a dozen briefings, which will support practitioners and policy makers to better understand the issues. Any research will be supported with the production of two infographic sheets annually, which will be disseminated out to 1000 practitioners and policy leads across London.

Research reports

We will be producing a mix of quantitative and qualitative research across the two-year programme, taking an in-depth look at a certain aspect of youth unemployment. Proposals will be drawn up, and submitted to the youth board to be discussed, before one is chosen. As well as the input from young people, research will be conducted based on data trends and what other organisations are saying would be useful in the coming years.

Briefings

Smaller briefings will be produced over the course of the programme on a range of topics, helping to support the youth-led campaigns as well as reacting to any emerging changes in the political situation. The briefing sheets will also be used to detail innovative solutions and case studies where good practice is improving outcomes.

Youth voice

Alongside data led research, it is important that young people play a pivotal role in challenging youth unemployment. Their experiences, perspective, and stories are important to challenging the stereotypes and perceptions around youth unemployment issues. We will consult a youth board in helping us make decisions on research to persue, and help organise youth champions to lead a campaign on an issue that is close to them.

Youth board

Several young people will be recruited from our 25% youth board to help steer the direction of programme. A total of 25 young people will be involved in this process, and supported by networks of up to 100 young people through specialist agencies. We have already engaged over 25 different groups to date including; specialist voluntary sector groups (i.e deaf and disabled), targeted employment support, local authorities, children in care councils, and supported housing providers. Their input will help direct the focus on our briefings, research, roundtables, and give feedback to the programme as we progress.

Youth led campaigns

We will be identifying six key challenges for young Londoners that impact their ability to get good, long term employment, and running a youth-led campaign to raise awareness of the issue. Each campaign will be led by a few key young people, who have direct experience on the topic. We will aim to engage 60-100 young people, across six different local areas of London.

Each topic will be identified by listening to what youth groups are saying across London, as well as the challenges experienced by hard to reach young people. Young people who want to be involved in making a change addressing the challenges closest to them will be supported to create campaign videos, materials, and to engage key stakeholders. We want them to tell us their stories in videos we help them create, give us feedback on our research, and present their challenges to policy makers.